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Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD

Bio PhD Sports Science CSCS,*D Inventor @hipthrusterofficial Owner @glutelabofficial Founder @bootybybretofficial Click below for programs and products:

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 Instagram Video by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "This is so much harder than it looks. Frog pump dropset: 50 reps with 150 lbs followed by 50 reps with bodyweight. Glute" at Glute Lab - 2028913502761828901
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This is so much harder than it looks. Frog pump dropset: 50 reps with 150 lbs followed by 50 reps with bodyweight. Glutes burned so bad then somehow became numb lol. Give this a try (probably with much lighter weight unless you’re a 245 lb ogre like me). Don’t necessarily go for 50/50 reps as I did, just rep out close to failure with both loads. Maybe you get 30/40, or 60/30. Chances are it’s gonna burn real good, unless your hip anatomy doesn’t jibe well with frog pumps (30% of people don’t feel frog pumps much). Try incorporating a Glute Loop; this sometimes helps. If not, do normal glute bridges or wide stance bridges with a Glute Loop and db. Pick the stance that works best for you and go crazy. Vid sped up 2X to show all the reps.

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Try this: ⁣ ⁣ 1️⃣ Load up barbell and place Glute Loop above knees⁣ 2️⃣ Perform 6 reps coming to a deadstop at the bottom and pausing for 1 second at the top⁣ 3️⃣ Perform 6 nonstop constant tension reps⁣ 4️⃣ Perform 6 top range pulses ⁣ 5️⃣ Roll the bar away and perform 20 abductions from the top position⁣ 6️⃣ Perform 20 abductions from the bottom position⁣ 7️⃣ Curse my name and feel the glute burn⁣ ⁣ Model: @katiecordoza ⁣ 🦍 in background: @bretcontreras1

 Instagram Image by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "This is an appreciation post to all my fellow personal trainers out there. ⁣
⁣
The other day, I walked into Glute Lab an" at CrossFit Invictus - 2026056633601031320
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This is an appreciation post to all my fellow personal trainers out there. ⁣ ⁣ The other day, I walked into Glute Lab and saw my trainers @alex.sterner and @arbryce in action. They were engrossed in coaching clients, carefully explaining the finer details of human movement. It dawned on me just how lucky our clients are to have such passionate coaches who genuinely care about helping others achieve their fitness goals. ⁣ ⁣ Personal trainers serve multiple roles as motivators, educators, counselors, and role models. They’re in an incredible position to effect positive, lasting change in others’ lives. ⁣ ⁣ It’s not easy being a good trainer. You have to train hard and eat well so you walk the walk, you have to get sufficient quality sleep and manage stress so you can be energized and upbeat, and you have to study and experiment so you talk the talk. You’re on your feet demoing exercises, analyzing movement patterns, and encouraging your clients all day long. It’s physically and mentally draining, and somehow, you’re supposed to stay on top of social media and keep learning - it’s a never ending job. ⁣ ⁣ At 42, I can no longer hang in the weight room like I could a decade ago. A few hours of solid personal training wipes me out. I don’t know how I used to do it all day long. Those of you trainers out there busting your day in and day out: the world is fortunate to have you. Be sure to thank your trainer or coach today!

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Many of you up and comers aren’t up to snuff on your strength and conditioning history. You assume that all these exercises have been around forever, but some of them have only been popularized in recent years. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Case in point: the goblet squat. This was invented by my friend @coachdanjohn (he also invented a lot of the loaded carries that are popular today). ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ The goblet squat should be a staple in most gyms. I use it as a warmup for my clients, as a teaching drill to master the squat pattern, as an intermediary for novices to bridge the gap between bodyweight and barbell squats, as a strength exercise, and as a conditioning tool. You can use a kettlebell, but I prefer a dumbbell since it’s easier to hold. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I coach this exercise uniquely. To me, everyone should teach the goblet squat this way as it’s self-correcting and teaches you to avoid knee valgus. You go elbows in, sink deep, and spread the knees. ⁣ ⁣ For some clients, the goblet squat provides the perfect strengthening stimulus (for example, 3 sets of 12 reps with a 60lb dumbbell), but stronger lifters can still benefit from them. I don’t care who you are - a set of 20 constant-tension reps with a 100lb dumbbell is brutal and hammers the quads. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Big thanks to Dan for bringing us this valuable squat variation. ⁣⁣

 Instagram Image by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "Too many people in fitness place way too much emphasis on being wiped out and sore. Excessive soreness is counterproduct" at Glute Lab - 2024449340094639583
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Too many people in fitness place way too much emphasis on being wiped out and sore. Excessive soreness is counterproductive to muscular development, and you won’t be able to progressively overload the if you’re never recovered. ⁣ ⁣ Whenever my clients tell me that they were so extremely sore from one my workouts, I apologize to them. They usually say, “No, that’s what I wanted!” to which I reply, “I know you like being sore because it lets you know you worked the muscle thoroughly, but I’m trying to get you stronger and fitter and that can’t happen if I’m beating you up too much.” ⁣ ⁣ A good trainer eases their clients into a program and transitions appropriately so as to produce the desired training effect that will cumulatively add up to the greatest positive net outcome. ⁣ ⁣ Any jackass with a whistle can make you vomit or leave you in a pool of sweat. It takes real knowledge to deliver the perfect stimulus that will allow for sequential gains and not hinder subsequent performance due to dips in performance on account of fatigue. ⁣ ⁣ Many of you up and comers don’t know who Mel Siff was. He was a sports science legend who wrote the book Supertraining and was way ahead of his time. Unfortunately he died of a heart attack at age 59 in 2003. He was the original buster of broscience and greatly influenced the majority of today’s popular strength coaches. ⁣

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Another reason to visit @glutelabofficial. You can take a picture in the selfie station.

 Instagram Image by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "22 years ago, I decided that it was time to toughen up and start squatting. Every article I'd read informed me that  wer" at Glute Lab - 2023769230396041160
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22 years ago, I decided that it was time to toughen up and start squatting. Every article I'd read informed me that were the King of Exercises and stated that they’d jack your testosterone and growth hormone through the roof so that all your muscles, even those in the upper body, would rapidly start growing! This turned out to be total broscience, but it convinced me to start squatting.⁣ ⁣ During my 1st squat session I hammered out sets with 95, 115, & 135lbs like a boss. A week later I was moving 185 lbs. Within a month, I was busting out 225lbs. I can still recall the feeling of my first set of 275lb . I proudly busted out 5 repetitions and my quads were on fire. Pretty soon I'd be squatting three plates!⁣ ⁣ Here's the crazy thing: In my mind, I was going deep - at least down to parallel. I was mortified to learn that what I thought were "deep " were in fact not even half-. They were quarter-. And I was using a squat pad because the bar hurt my traps, but I digress. ⁣ ⁣ Shortly after my big set with 275lbs, something very memorable occurred. A mountain of a man walked up behind me and uttered these life-altering words:⁣ ⁣ "Why don't you drop down to 135 and squat deep like a real man?"⁣ ⁣ I turned to look his way, but he didn't even look in my direction or alter his gait. It was as if I was too insignificant to be worthy of eye contact. From behind, he looked like he could squat a grand. In retrospect, I think it might have been Bill Kazmaier.⁣ ⁣ Lucky for me, in a rare moment of rational thinking at the age of 20, I decided to take the behemoth's advice. I stripped the plates off and reduced the load to 135lbs and performed 3 sets of 10 full .⁣ ⁣ I felt muscles working in ways they'd never worked before and the next day my and adductors were toast. From there on out, I was a legitimate squatter. In the next year to come, my would grow like crazy.⁣ ⁣ More vital to my long-term learning, though, is that I realized the importance of full range of motion and proper form over loading. Of course, full range depends on the individual, but gains will come faster if you create a proper foundation. ⁣

 Instagram Image by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "The gluteus maximus is an understudied muscle. Many researchers avoid examining the  for obvious reasons. Since they com" at Glute Lab - 2022811256982832308
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The gluteus maximus is an understudied muscle. Many researchers avoid examining the for obvious reasons. Since they comprise the buttocks, scientists aren’t always comfortable examining them. For this reason, we don’t have a lot of research to guide us on optimal glute training. ⁣ ⁣ Obviously, we can rely upon research on other muscle groups, but we must be cautious in doing so as the are unique. They are the largest muscle in the body, they have unique architecture, they exhibit their highest EMG activity at the shortest muscle lengths possible (most muscles are activated highest in more lengthened positions), and they create the most active force in only a slightly stretched position. Therefore, we can’t assume that they behave and are bounded by the same rules as other muscles.⁣ ⁣ We have many unanswered questions as of yet. Are hip thrusts better than and deadlifts for glute development? And what about half versus parallel or deep ? Though we have EMG research, we have no training studies comparing these while measuring actual glute hypertrophy. ⁣ ⁣ There is only one study to my knowledge looking at optimal glute volume when training to failure and it showed that 5-10 sets per week were better than 15-20 sets per week. But most female physique competitors perform much more volume than this. ⁣ ⁣ Should compound movements for the be performed prior to targeted single-joint movements for ? Are abduction movements additive or redundant for glute growth if you’re already doing hip extension exercises? How often should we train the ? These are all unexplored. ⁣ ⁣ Research on other muscles suggests that 2 days a week is ideal, but most female physique competitors are training more frequently.⁣ ⁣We can surely look to the literature to give us clues, but as of right now we must heavily consider anecdotes and logical reasoning/scientific rationale due to the absence of controlled research. ⁣ ⁣ My rule of thirds IG post from February 2018 makes the most sense to me for glute specialization training, but individual differences in anatomy and physiology must always be taken into account.⁣

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Try this kickass cable column glute workout: ⁣ ⁣ Cable goblet squat 3 x 8-15 reps⁣ Cable glute bridge 3 x 15-20 reps⁣ Cable fire hydrant 3 x 12-15 reps⁣ Cable kneeling kickback 3 x 12-15 reps⁣ Cable standing hip abduction 3 x 12-15 reps⁣ Cable pull-through 3 x 12-15 reps ⁣ ⁣ A dip belt suffices for the glute bridge but a padded or neoprene belt works better. You’ll likely need to MacGuyver something up to elevate it. ⁣ ⁣ Model: @jamiederevere

 Instagram Image by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "Time and time again, I’ve heard strength coaches and physical therapists say that the hamstrings don’t change length dur" at Glute Lab - 2021547428026514788
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Time and time again, I’ve heard strength coaches and physical therapists say that the hamstrings don’t change length during the squat. They base this statement on the notion that the and knees move through similar ranges of motion. However, what they don’t know is that the hamstrings have greater moment arms at the compared to the knees, which means that every degree of hip flexion will cause greater length change than a degree of knee extension. ⁣ ⁣ Moreover, the joint angles and ranges of motion associated with a squat are dependent on anthropometry and squat style. ⁣In the graphic shown above, for example, a low bar wide stance sit-back-style squat with flat shoes creates a hip angle of 43° and a knee angle of 77°. In contrast, an upright deep front squat with squat shoes exhibits a hip angle of 66° and a knee angle of 42°. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ Using methods from a 1990 article published in the Journal of Biomechanics by Hawkins and Hull, I estimated the length of the difference hamstring muscles at the bottom of both squat styles and included the Romanian deadlift for comparison. In the front squat, semimembranosus length decreased by almost 8%, while the other hammie muscles did not change much; in the powerlifting low bar-style squat, semitendinosus and biceps femoris long head increased 10-12%; the hamstrings lengthened 12-15% in the Romanian deadlift. ⁣⁣ ⁣⁣ I don’t completely trust this data, but it serves as a decent and portrays the impact of squat style on hamstring length. ⁣Science rules! ⁣⁣

 Instagram Carousel by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "It is mandatory that I have the absolute best glute training equipment here at @glutelabofficial. ⁣
Which is why I just " at Glute Lab - 2020772376137882365
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It is mandatory that I have the absolute best glute training equipment here at @glutelabofficial. ⁣ Which is why I just picked up a Gluteator from @dynavecmd. This machine is badass! It combines hip extension and hip abduction and produces a crazy glute burn. I had to get out of the seat and stand up in between sets 2 and 3 because my were burning so badly. ⁣ ⁣ I paid full price for this, and I’ve never promoted anything on IG as a trade for a free product. I simply doing this to support good inventions and show off Glute Lab. Swipe left to see it in action. ⁣

 Instagram Carousel by Bret "Glute Guy" Contreras PhD (@bretcontreras1) with caption : "Here’s a hip thrust history lesson for you. When I first thought up the hip thrust in 2006, it never dawned on me that I" at Glute Lab - 2020073821416849255
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Here’s a hip thrust history lesson for you. When I first thought up the hip thrust in 2006, it never dawned on me that I could use a regular bench. I invented the Skorcher, and all of my clients hip thrusted off of this apparatus for two solid years. In fact, we exclusively used the Skorcher at my gym Lifts (in Scottsdale) from 2007-2009. When I was writing my ebook in 2009, I realized I needed to teach people how to hip thrust without the Skorcher. This is when I thought up the standard bench method that is prevalent today around the globe. ⁣ ⁣ The Skorcher hip thrust, however, is much more difficult to perform, as you have to sink your well below the feet, which causes you to use more hamstring and perform more overall work. The first video shows me hip thrusting off the Skorcher in my garage in 2011, sporting a mohawk. ⁣ ⁣ Today, I made my trainers @arbryce and @alex.sterner try out the Skorcher barbell hip thrust and it kicked their butts! We can only use around 60% of the weight we use for regular hip thrusts. I had @sorinex build me the updated unit; it’s more robust and has handles for single leg hip thrusts, along with band peg attachments. There are only a few of these units out there. ⁣ ⁣ ⁣You can mimic a Skorcher with 2 benches or with a GHD and tall plyos boxes - MacGuyver could do it with ease. Anyway, now you’re in the know! The evolution of the hip thrust is a very cool story.