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Bio Official account of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), an agency of the U.S. Department of Defense.

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List of Instagram medias taken by DARPA (@darpa)

 image by DARPA (@darpa) with caption : "Our Subterranean Challenge asks a lot of competing teams. They must develop systems that can rapidly navigate, map, asse" - 1891481771066032766
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Our Subterranean Challenge asks a lot of competing teams. They must develop systems that can rapidly navigate, map, assess, and sustain operations in challenging and diverse underground environments. The team led by Endeavor Robotics is pursuing an interesting potential solution in the form of a robot "marsupial" that transports a range of smaller robots for use as needed. They've produced a concept video showing potential solutions for improving wireless communication, vertical exploration, and traversing rough terrain. Link in profile or https://youtu.be/xe9eBSYqZBA.

 image by DARPA (@darpa) with caption : "What lies beneath? It’s a question that nine DARPA-funded teams (seven physical Systems track, two Virtual track) and ot" - 1877691713326508846
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What lies beneath? It’s a question that nine DARPA-funded teams (seven physical Systems track, two Virtual track) and other independently funded teams will have the chance to answer as part of our Subterranean Challenge! See the link in our profile (or visit www.darpa.mil) to meet the teams and learn more. Why focus on the underground environment? The world beneath us leaves much to be discovered. These uncharted environments pose immense challenges to military and emergency personnel as they respond to threats from adversaries or natural disasters.

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Investments in vaccine technology made under DARPA's Blue Angel program continue to pay dividends years after the program concluded. Researchers recently reported positive results in Science Advances, describing "preclinical and clinical trials that demonstrate the feasibility of an adjuvanted, intradermal vaccine that induced single shot protection in ferrets and seroprotection in humans against one of the more lethal strains of pandemic flu, Indonesia H5N1." DARPA funded development of the method for producing vaccine antigen in tobacco plants (shown here), along with the use of adjuvant that, according to an article in The Washington Post, "speeds up and strengthens the body's response to the vaccine." The results come at the 100th anniversary of the influenza outbreak of 1918, a reminder of the deadly potential of pandemic illnesses. According to the CDC, the death toll from the 1918 pandemic was higher than from World War I. DARPA's Biological Technologies Office has an entire portfolio of research programs aimed at removing the pandemic threat. DARPA is developing technology to detect and characterize bio-threats anytime, anywhere, and coming up with fast-acting, new countermeasures that can be produced and distributed rapidly and at scale.

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This morning at sunrise, the American flag was unfurled on the west side of the Pentagon near the 9/11 Memorial. Though we cannot fill the void left by those lost, their memory inspires us every day to bolster our efforts to keep our country and fellow citizens safe and secure, and we are grateful to the millions of women and men stationed at home and abroad who share in that mission.

Last week at D60, attendees got to see a demonstration of our Z-Man climbing technology. The now-complete program developed new tools for scaling a variety of surfaces, even glass. @draperlab created the technology, and it is now being commercialized by @atlasdevices. The paddles shown here blend a gripping material inspired by the structure of a gecko’s foot with vacuum seals created by the downward force of the climber’s legs.

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A theme of our D60 symposium is the need for DARPA-developed technology to move from the lab into application. We have a long history of successful transitions, such as the Javelin Anti-Tank System shown here. Javelin was developed as part of the Assault Breaker suite of programs. For current and future DARPA technologies to be as successful, we need active partnerships with the military, government, commercial industry, and other investors and organizations.

At the D60 symposium we’re celebrating DARPA’s past, present, and future. But let’s focus on the past for a moment. Here are a few snaps of technologies on display in our expo hall: the EXACTO self-steering round; our “Virginia Slims” miniaturized GPS receiver; the Spot ; and the Transit , the first satellite in what would become the world’s first global satellite navigation system.

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We’re opening the doors to the demo hall at D60 and happy to share some of the exhibits online, too. Here we have technologies from our Ground X-Vehicle Technologies program, including multi-mode extreme travel suspension from Pratt & Miller and the reconfigurable wheel-track from Carnegie Mellon University’s National Robotics Engineering Center. @carnegiemellon @prattmiller

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The D60 symposium got off to an early start this morning with a poster session and competition among our new class of "DARPA Risers" -- junior researchers selected and mentored by DARPA program managers who represent the future of defense-relevant research. From a pool of fifty Risers, three will ultimately be selected to present their research on Friday to the general session. All of them, however, are making impressive contributions to their fields, and we're excited to share their work with our guests at .

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Smaller. Lighter. Faster. Smarter. Our engineers have been hard at work refining software and adapting commercially available sensors to enable small UAVs to autonomously navigate unknown environments. Operating as part of human-machine teams, smart UAVs could scout an area and report back to a squad without putting humans at risk. Why autonomy? According to the program manager, unmanned systems equipped with these algorithms need no remote pilot, no GPS guidance, no communications link, and no pre-programmed map of an area to operate. The onboard software, lightweight processor, and low-cost sensors do all of the work in real-time. And because the system doesn't require a communications link back to its base, the chances of an adversary detecting troop presence based on radio transmissions is reduced. There would be similar applications in disaster zones, where FLA-equipped UAVs could survey damaged buildings to evaluate risks to first responders.

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We're into Day 2 of our Electronics Resurgence Initiative (ERI) Summit in San Francisco, where leaders of the electronics community have convened to discuss the future of the U.S. industry. On Day 1, we unveiled the teams selected by DARPA to take on six new ERI "Page 3" programs, while keynote speakers addressed the critical role public/private partnerships play in the innovation cycle. The "Page 3" programs are so named for their adherence to the guidance shared by Gordon Moore on the third page of his seminal 1965 research paper that articulated the technology trend that became known as Moore's Law. First, although Moore could not have foreseen the extent to which his observations on transistor scaling would be stretched, he predicted even then that newly designed automation procedures would be needed to lay out circuits too complex for manual design. In response, the ERI "Page 3" Design programs seek to answer this question: Can we dramatically lower the barriers to modern System-on-Chip design and unleash a new era of circuit and system specialization and innovation? Second, designed to fulfill the post-scaling predictions made by Moore, the ERI "Page 3" Architectures programs seek to answer: "Can we enjoy the benefits of specialized and application-reconfigurable circuitry while still relying on general programming constructs through integrated software/hardware co-design?" And third, Moore envisioned building larger circuitry functions out of smaller functional blocks as a means of overcoming limitations to scaling in electronics. With this notion in mind, the ERI "Page 3" Materials & Integration programs seek to answer this question: "Can we use the integration of unconventional electronics materials to enhance conventional silicon circuits and continue the progress in performance traditionally associated with scaling?" DARPA has selected research teams from academia, commercial industry, and the defense industrial base to take on these challenges.

 image by DARPA (@darpa) with caption : "The Fast Lightweight Autonomy program recently completed Phase 2 flight tests, demonstrating advanced algorithms designe" - 1826431745407708624
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The Fast Lightweight Autonomy program recently completed Phase 2 flight tests, demonstrating advanced algorithms designed to turn small air and ground systems into team members that can autonomously perform tasks dangerous for humans -- such as pre-mission reconnaissance in a hostile urban setting or searching damaged structures for survivors following an earthquake. The aerial tests showed significant progress in urban outdoor and indoor autonomous flight scenarios, including: 1) Flying at increased speeds between multi-story buildings and through tight alleyways while identifying objects of interest; 2) Flying through a narrow window into a building and down a hallway searching rooms and creating a 3-D map of the interior; and 3) Identifying and flying down a flight of stairs and exiting the building through an open doorway.

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We're one step closer to our vision of a reusable spaceplane following ten successful firings of the AR-22 engine in 240 hours! The team of DARPA, @NASAStennis, @Boeing Space, and @Aerojet_Rocketdyne proved that the propulsion system is ready for our Experimental Spaceplane program with its goal of on-demand space launch with rapid turnaround between launches.

 image by DARPA (@darpa) with caption : "We're firing the AR-22 engine for our Experimental Spaceplane program at @NASAStennis. @Boeing & @Aerojet_Rocketdyne are" - 1814719108143645789
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We're firing the AR-22 engine for our Experimental Spaceplane program at @NASAStennis. @Boeing & @Aerojet_Rocketdyne are helping us meet our goals of rapid access to space and resilient space operations.

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Throughout its history, DARPA has run a series of "x-plane" programs that have pushed the limits of aeronautics and given rise to powerful new flight capabilities and designs. At D60, DARPA's 60th anniversary symposium, a breakout session on x-planes will trace this evolution. Shown here, the X-29, the result of a joint effort by DARPA, the U.S. Air Force, NASA's Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, the Air Force Flight Test Center, and the Grumman Corporation. The program was managed by the Air Force's Wright Laboratory, Wright Patterson Air Force Base. The forward-swept wing of the X-29 was one of the most unusual designs in aviation history. The fighter-sized technology demonstrator also explored the use of advanced composites in aircraft construction; variable-camber wing surfaces; a thin, supercritical airfoil; strakes; close-coupled canards; and a computerized fly-by-wire flight control system used to maintain control of the otherwise unstable aircraft.

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Our Ground X-Vehicle Technologies (GXV-T) program aims to improve mobility, survivability, safety, and effectiveness of future combat vehicles without piling on armor. Recent demonstrations show progress on technologies for traveling quickly over varied terrain and improving situational awareness and ease of operation. Shown here, a morphing track-to-wheel technology developed by @CarnegieMellon's National Robotics Engineering Center that helps optimize mobility over different types of terrain -- wheels allow fast travel on hard surfaces, while tracks are better suited to soft ground. RWTs, as they're known, can change from wheel to track and back again within two seconds while the vehicle is in motion.

 image by DARPA (@darpa) with caption : "DARPA's Ground X-Vehicle Technologies (GXV-T) program aims to improve mobility, survivability, safety, and effectiveness" - 1807552553152933040
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DARPA's Ground X-Vehicle Technologies (GXV-T) program aims to improve mobility, survivability, safety, and effectiveness of future combat vehicles without piling on armor. Recent demonstrations show progress on technologies for traveling quickly over varied terrain and improving situational awareness and ease of operation. For instance, the high-travel suspension shown here extends up to 6'! It allows the vehicle to handle steep slopes and grades by actively and independently adjusting suspension on each wheel. Check out a video of this technology and more on YouTube (DARPAtv) or on darpa.mil. These demonstrations feature technologies developed for DARPA by: 1) Carnegie Mellon University, National Robotics Engineering Center 2) Honeywell International 3) Pratt & Miller 4) QinetiQ 5) Raytheon BBN Technologies.

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Our Make-It program is developing new software and hardware to speed the process of chemical synthesis and bring on-demand production of molecules to new locations and researchers. For the military, synthetic chemistry could yield novel propellants for spacecraft engines; new pharmaceuticals and medicines for troops in the field; lighter and longer-lasting batteries and fuel cells; advanced adhesives, coatings and paints; and less expensive explosives that are safer to handle. Researchers on Make-It have been successful in applying machine learning to the molecular synthesis process. Make-It software can recommend optimal synthesis pathways (i.e., the "recipe" to make a particular molecule), freeing actual chemists to focus on molecular discovery and innovation. Make-It hardware can then produce molecules on demand. The Make-It team includes researchers from the Massachusetts, Institute of Technology, SRI, Grzybowski Scientific Inventions, University of Glasgow, Purdue University, and Boston University. Images by @MITpics & SRI.