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Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) Instagram Profile Photo stevewinterphoto
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Steve Winter

Bio NatGeo Wildlife + Conservation Photojournalist + Speaker. Now touring with @NatGeo Live! Click on link below for tour stops and tix.

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Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) Instagram photos and videos

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 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provid" - 2027766571254845577
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provide us with half of the world’s wildlife and 2/3’s of the plant life on earth – 80% of the biodiversity is found in forests. Forests pump the oxygen we need to live. They cool the planet and provide us with fresh water as they help make it rain! Forests, grasslands and mountains provide 75% of fresh water. Our planet is all connected and we are part of it all – we need to all work towards a future where we protect 50% of our planet – so we have a future for generations to come. @africaparksnetwork@sanctuaryasia@thephotosociety@natgeofineart@natgeoimagecollection

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provid" - 2027734821380040092
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Happy Earth Day!!!!!! Forests are vitally important to our blue planet - they provide us with half of the world’s wildlife and 2/3’s of the plant life on earth – 80% of the biodiversity is found in forests. Forests pump the oxygen we need to live. They cool the planet and provide us with fresh water as they help make it rain! Forests, grasslands and mountains provide 75% of fresh water. Our planet is all connected and we are part of it all – we need to all work towards a future where we protect 50% of our planet – so we have a future for generations to come. @africaparksnetwork@sanctuaryasia@thephotosociety@natgeofineart@natgeoimagecollection

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@natgeo@stevewinterphoto shot on iPhone HAPPY EARTH DAY - tomorrow!!! We as humans are apart of nature - the natural world keeps us alive - giving us the air we breathe, the water we drink - the land to grow the food we eat. Here we are filming at a waterhole in Zakouma in Chad. Alex and I are thinking about getting to the hide - but that would be a foolish move with the herd of Ele’s!! What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork@alexbraczkowski

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork

Zakouma NP Ranger talking to a village council - African P" - 2020784368499216299
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto with @africanparksnetwork Zakouma NP Ranger talking to a village council - African Parks looks at the animals, habitat and people that live within as a true ecosystem. Every individual part is vital to the whole ecosystem and success of the park. Read below What is happening in Zakouma is one of the most hopeful stories in conservation. The park was once ravaged by poaching and insecurity. More than 4,000 elephants, which was 95% of the population, were slaughtered between 2002 to 2010 for the sale of their ivory – and poachers wreaked havoc on both the wildlife and people who lived there. By 2010, only 450 elephants remained. That same year, @africanparksnetwork signed a long-term agreement with the government of Chad to fully manage Zakouma and change the trajectory of the park. They built a ranger team and implemented effective law enforcement measures and community networks, and today poaching has been practically eliminated. The elephant population is finally on the rise for the first time in a decade. Elephants have surpassed 550 individuals, and not one has been lost to poaching since January 2016. Last year @africanparksnetwork counted 81 elephant calves under the age of three years old; in 2011 they counted one. Without the support of local communities this would not work. The park is the largest employer in the region; thousands of people are getting an education and healthcare, and decency and civility, along with life, have found their back to this once forgotten place. To learn more about Zakouma and other truly hopeful conservation efforts happening across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto -
Lion cub walking through the grasses to the pride.
Just 100 years ago there may hav" - 2020035506079600356
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto - Lion cub walking through the grasses to the pride. Just 100 years ago there may have been as many as 500,000 lions which roamed the African continent but today there it is estimated that as few as 16,000 - 30,000 remain, and research by lion biologist Hans Bauer and colleagues suggests lions in much of west, east and central Africa will decline by 50% in the next two decades if something dramatic is not done! The biggest threats facing lions in Africa are poaching of their prey and retaliatory killings by farmers when lions eat their cattle! There is also an emerging threat of lions being used in Chinese medicine as tigers become rarer. @wildaid "When the buying stops the killing can too” Poisonings and poaching are the main threats to lions across their East African range. Most lion populations in East, Central and West Africa are declining so the time to act is now. Their long-term future remains in question: they are threatened by habitat loss and fragmentation, lack of prey, unsustainable hunting and now poaching for their skins, bones, claws and other parts. But projects like these show how with determination, political will, community support, and simply envisioning a better future, we can bring this species back as well as protect our last wild landscapes, benefiting both wildlife and people, and creating a better existence for all. To learn more about inspiring conservation stories from across Africa, please follow @africanparksnetwork me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and Thanks!! @thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork@leonardodicapriofdn

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
Zebra family rubbing noses.
This animal behavior is so similar in many ways to us as " - 2018938163636741248
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Zebra family rubbing noses. This animal behavior is so similar in many ways to us as humans! Our animal family is so much like us - they find mates, they have kids, they have to feed themselves and their families. If we can find a way to believe they think, feel and have emotions, we need to treat them better and find a way to ensure their future on this planet. They are keystone species in their ecosystems, though we as humans are not. @thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork

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@natgeo video shot by @stevewinterphoto One of my goals in capturing this mind blowing natural coexistence between leopards and humans was to show it on video. I set up a HD video trap with LED lights and infrared triggers to show the cats walking across the bridges of the park. Here is a young female walking across the bridge in the full moon. Sanjay Gandhi National Park (SGNP) in Mumbai India is a jewel of the world. Mumbai can show the world the way forward in living with large cats! As there is no other place like it on the planet. SGNP is more proof that we humans live with majestic animals in urban areas without even knowing they are there - and without major problems - if we let them be. Leopards are the most adaptable and the most persecuted cat on our planet. Protect Sanjay Gandhi National Park and Aarey and all the buffer zones. India has had great success living with tigers and leopards. Here in the park the incredible work done by the staff of SGNP and scientist Vidya Athreya has been vital. India is so unique in the world in their spiritual and cultural respect for living with tigers, leopards and elephants etc. Take this honor with the responsibility for saving SGNP and all the animals within. The problems in the past in SGNP were created by humans - relocating leopards from 200km away into the city in an area that already had resident males or females - human mistakes, caused problems in 2002 and 2003. Our natural world is simply perfect and incredibly amazing. And without it we as humans cannot survive - we are part of nature and we need to wake up and save the planet that we depend on for our oxygen, water and food - and simply all life itself - which also includes us as humans. If we can save big cats we can save ourselves. As their homes are the forests, grasslands and mountains which provide us with close to half of our oxygen, 75% of our freshwater. me @stevewinterphoto to see other images, thanks! @natgeo@thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork@sanctuaryasia

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
A fisherman and his kids returning home at the end of the day. Kaziranga National Par" - 2017106265277159442
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto A fisherman and his kids returning home at the end of the day. Kaziranga National Park. Check out Zoom Photo Tours and come with me and Sharon Guynup to Kazi and Bandhavgarh Tiger Réserve this November 2019. @zoomphototours To see images of big cats and life around them, follow me @stevewinterphoto - Thanks! @thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork@sanctuaryasia

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto
 Camo Leopard
There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the sou" - 2014590980980601670
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto Camo Leopard There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. This was shot while on assignment for @natgeo Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and thanks! @natgeo@thephotosociety@eiainvestigator@africanparksnetwork

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto

Scarface grabs his favorite food here in the P" - 2014037568094376093
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@natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto Scarface grabs his favorite food here in the Pantanal of Brazil - the Caiman is the food source of jaguars in this area. When the rains are good in the Amazon and the rivers rise in the Pantanal - the animals are abundant and the jaguars have a huge food court of prey to choose from - as nature is all connected. The Amazon provides 20% of the oxygen we breathe - so every 5th breathe is from the Amazon. Rainforests provide 40-50% of the oxygen on the planet - mountains, grasslands and forests provide 75% of our fresh water If we save the homes of big cats we can help save ourselves. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid To see more images of big cats follow me @stevewinterphoto - Thanks! @thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork@pantanalsafaris@reddigitalcinema@pantanalsafaris@bertiegregory

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto

A GIANT Caiman in the Black Creek in the Panta" - 2012744922457478748
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@natgeo photo for Jaguar Story Dec 2017 Nat Geo Mag by @stevewinterphoto A GIANT Caiman in the Black Creek in the Pantanal of Brazil - the Caiman is the food source of jaguars in this area. This caiman looks too big for a jag to take down! But you never know!!!!!! When the rains are good in the Amazon and the rivers rise in the Pantanal - the animals are abundant and the jaguars have a huge food court of prey to choose from - as nature is all connected. The Amazon provides 20% of the oxygen we breathe - so every 5th breathe is from the Amazon. Rainforests provide 40-50% of the oxygen on the planet - mountains, grasslands and forests provide 75% of our fresh water If we save the homes of big cats we can help save ourselves. “When the buying stops, the killing can too.” @wildaid To see more images of big cats follow me @stevewinterphoto - Thanks! @thephotosociety@africanparksnetwork@pantanalsafaris@reddigitalcinema@pantanalsafaris

 image by Steve Winter (@stevewinterphoto) with caption : "@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto

There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of " - 2010479513947829100
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@natgeo photo by @stevewinterphoto There are nine sub-species of leopards on earth, occurring from the southern tip of South Africa's Cape mountains to the island of Java in southeast Asia. The leopard can live in true deserts, tropical forests and even in the Russian tundra where it drops to below 10 degrees celsius! The biggest threats facing leopards in Africa include the illegal skin trade, wire snare poaching and human-leopard conflict. This was shot while on assignment for @natgeo Forests provide us with up to 50% of the oxygen we breathe - oceans the rest.Forest, grasslands and mountains give us 75% of the fresh water. If we can save the forest of the Amazon and other areas in Central and South America for the jaguar and Puma. The forests of Central Africa for the leopard, lion, elephants etc. And the forests of South Asia for the Tigers and Leopards. If you save the top predator in any ecosystem you save everything that lives with them. So if - We Save Big Cats we can help Save Ourselves. follow me @stevewinterphoto to see more images and thanks! @natgeo@thephotosociety@eiainvestigator@africanparksnetwork